Category: civil rights act of 1964

Justice Scalia and the politics of racial resentment

scalia-465.pngBy Alan Bean

According to Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, the Supreme Court needs to rescue Washington politicians from the scourge of political correctness.  Sure, the Senate voted 98-0 to keep key provisions of the 1965 Voting Rights Act in place, Scalia seemed to be saying, but they only voted that way because the right to vote has become a “black entitlement” and Senators didn’t see an upside to opposing civil rights.

One assumes the same arguments could have been employed against the Voting Rights Act when it was initially passed a half-century ago.  After Schwerner, Chaney and Goodman were murdered in 1964 for trying to register black voters in Mississippi, and after civil rights leaders were gassed, beaten and trampled by horses on the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma,, Alabama in 1965 public opinion was inflamed and a band of craven politicians yielded to the dictates of political correctness by unconstitutionally placing sovereign states under a federal yoke.  Is that what Justice Scalia believes?  And what of Justices Roberts, Thomas, Kennedy and Alito?  Do they buy this line of reasoning? (more…)